Community

Core Values at University

Core values are, quite literally, at the core of University High School. Whether it’s a student-led community meeting on the topic of mutual respect, support, and trust or a Community Day spent packing meals for Kids Against Hunger to emphasize stewardship, the core values of University High School are as much a part of the student experience as are math, science, and English.

The six core values of University High School are creativity; diversity; commitment to excellence; mutual respect, support, and trust; commitment to personal responsibility; and stewardship.

Here Are Just a Few Examples of the Core Values in Action:

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Creativity

Student artwork lines the hallways and fills the lobby at University. And it’s not just taped to the walls. All student artwork is matted and framed, giving the work prestige and making the school feel like an art gallery.

Diversity

Students and staff take time to learn about each other, and some of our community meetings are dedicated to exploring the different cultures and religions that make up our school. A group of international students from China, for example, taught the school about the history and significance of Chinese New Year.

Commitment to Excellence

Exemplary student work is celebrated almost daily at community meeting. Whether it’s someone being named a National Merit Scholar or an athlete signing a National Letter of Intent, we celebrate students and their achievements together.

Mutual Respect, Support, & Trust

Not a day goes by without a student doing something nice for a peer. One student dedicated her entire year to holding the door for her peers as they left community meeting. She never missed a day, and when it was cold, she brought a blanket.

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Personal Responsibility

Students have real responsibility for the well-being of their school, and in turn, the school values student voice. There are student representatives on every hiring committee at University.

Stewardship

Service is a key focus of the school. During one recent Community Day, students spent the morning packing meals for Kids Against Hunger and the afternoon learning about the greater issues surrounding hunger and food allocation.